How it works

The aviation market has been seeking two innovations: the ability to stay airborne for days and weeks at a time in order to achieve surveillance, search and survey tasks; and the ability to transport heavy goods point-to-point, without the need for expensive airport infrastructure. 

The aerospace company that solves either of these problems with a safe, robust and reliable aircraft will dominate these markets.  HAV has developed the Airlander range that can achieve this by engineering a design that involves gaining “free lift” from helium, whilst utilising the controllability of having an aerodynamic shape, and having engines that rotate and can direct their thrust in any direction.
Aerodynamic Lift – Typ. +40%
Increases lift efficiency
Creates the perfect balance between economic flight, operational flexibility, range and payload.
Vectored Thrust Lift – Typ. +/- 25%
Principally for take off & landing
Overcomes key operational shortfalls of traditional airships through combining buoyancy, aerodynamics and vectored thrust to generate lift.
Buoyant Lift – Typ. +60%
Provides zero energy lift
Wing-shaped hull with bow thruster and wide track air cushioned landing system is stable and manoeuvrable in flight and on the ground, allied to failure tolerant system architecture.




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Latest News

On Tuesday 4 July, Airlander undertook it’s 5th Test flight
On Tuesday 4 July, Airlander undertook it’s 5th Test flight. The flight included the proving of an alternative landing technique in preparation for when we commence heavier flight trials (this technique had been developed in the simulator based on data from previous test flights). The flight also included a level-flight acceleration and deceleration run. The Airlander 10, piloted by Chief Test Pilot Dave Burns, left its mast at 18:05 and took to the skies 2 minutes later. Dave landed Airlander at 20:29 and was on the mast at 20:36 for a total flight time of 2 hours 31 mins (airborne time 2 hours 22 minutes). The flight was extremely successful, achieving all its aims. In particular, following three good practice landings at altitude, the landing on this flight was exceptionally smooth. The success of this flight has set the framework for bringing forward customer readiness of the Airlander. The overall operating envelope remained similar to previous flights in being up to 4000 feet altitude, 40 knots speed and within 15 Nautical Miles of Cardington. Due to a lower cloud base, Airlander attained a maximum altitude of 3500 feet during this flight, and a maximum speed of 37 knots.

Video Channel

How Collaborative Expertise Launched the Airlander Project
A video from The Institution of Engineering and Technology explaining how Hybrid Air Vehicles has been working with Forward Composites to apply decades of race-bred British carbon composite expertise in the development and manufacture of the revolutionary Airlander.
#AeroEngineering apprentice Joseph giving a windy tour of #Airlander to @KingsWorcester cadets on a special visit f… https://t.co/DWxq27qGXS
Save August 24 in your diary as the hour long #Airlander episode of #ImpossibleEngineering is on @UKTV Yesterday.… https://t.co/xUWLJdYmsW
RT @RAF_Eng_Rec: Cyberspace Communication Specialists from 90SU supporting Airlander Challenge #STEM @RAF_EBTA @raf_engagement @RAFEngineer…